Training Video Feedback


(James Endicott) #1

Good afternoon,

We are just putting the final touches on our Information Security Program (ISP) here at the City of Kent. One of our projects/initiatives in the ISP is implementing KnowBe4’s training videos.

I want to share some of the early feedback we are getting and see if other organizations are receiving similar feedback. We are getting positive feedback but wanted to share some of the concerns our users are expressing.

Reminder: There is no right or wrong in this feedback, it is what our customers are telling us!!!

Videos are too long-Customers would rather see multiple 3-4 minutes or “snack sized” videos that are quickly digestible vs a single 20-25 minute video.

Employees attention span wont last 20+ minutes in a video-Make shorter specific topic videos

Though interesting, KM demonstrating isn’t entirely impactful. Just get to the point, short and concise videos that tackle a specific area, not longer generic videos

Supporting/training collateral: Posters, Infographics, flyers etc that support the specific topics of the videos

Hope to hear other agencies experiences.

Thanks.


(Bruce Campbell) #2

We have just started using the KnowBe4 videos as as well. I’m getting some of the same responses. The videos seem a little long and dry.


(William Holmberg) #3

We are also receiving this feedback, nearly word for word. In addition, our users are ignorant of many basic skills and computer fundamentals. I don’t get to Vett them before they are hired, but am expected to control and support them after they are on board. So another complaint is that the videos can be difficult to understand- some “advanced” actions are taken for granted by the videographer and terms aren’t always explained, nor are acronyms.

Personally, I like the videos.


(Jeremy Fennessy) #4

What feedback have others received from executives? I find that C-level and those just below don’t want to sit through the training and who is going to tell them they have to? I am currently doing onsite walkthroughs of the material for them to make sure they understand why this is important since they are the most at risk of a spear phishing attack. Anyone else have a way to combat this?


(Sharon Guillory) #5

I also found the videos a bit long and pretty dry, but I haven’t gone through them all. The KM videos are a little hard to slog through, and I can tell I’ll get a lot of pushback. I’m going to start my people on the shorter, more specific videos, just to get them used to the idea, before asking them to take on 25 minutes (45 minutes is off the table for all but my tech staff).

I would like to see more short videos targeted at specific threats. I think folks will be able to digest these smaller helpings.


(Steve) #6

On the whole I found the video’s informative for staff, some actually said they were interesting!
Yes, shorter is always better.
The only thing I could add is to try and make the video’s a little less “American” they mention legislation that doesn’t apply to us here in Australia.
As a result our HR department veto’d all but one video.
I’m sure the videos could be made more generic just by using phrases like Could be and some countries etc


#7

Similar here, especially the regional issues of some of the videos - could do with more examples and content related to European and other eareas perhaps.


(Jeffrey Miller) #8

I agree 100% with what James has to say. Employees just don’t have the care to sit through a 25 min video


(Patrick Russell) #9

Very similar responses from the users at my site.

Shorter videos would definitely be better for a quick training session on a specific topic.


(Ray) #10

I agree that some of the training is long and although I think its important end users don’t always feel the same way and they like to skip through the training faster. I do believe the 2016 training that includes more interactive sections is better than the 2015 which the only real interaction was clicking “Next”. I think adding more Q&A throughout could keep end users more entertained and focused.

I like that KB4 tracks end user training time, its easy to spot which users click through without covering the material. The only bad part is when you pause the video, the course timer keeps going. Some of the training times for my users are several hours long for a 20 minute course.


(Dan) #11

I agree with a lot of these comments. I can sit through the 45-min videos, but end users ALWAYS complain about lack of time. I like the idea of more user interaction on Q&A would be beneficial. And I have seen hours with no completion status as well. User started, stopped but never closed out.

I do like that some of the topics/ideas covered are not just the basic outline regurgitated by every other training course. We just finished the GLBA course and that sparked comments from our CEO for tightened security measures, which is nice to see.


#12

I too have also heard from users that the videos are too long, especially when required to watch multiple videos. The one thing that I do not like is the users can just keep hitting the next button and I can see in the admin console that they just blasted through and spent 5 minutes on a 30 minute video. I do like the fact that some of the newer videos have a the interactive quiz at the end but unless they know the results of the quiz are going to an administrator or supervisor I don’t think users take it very seriously. I’d rather see a landing page video that details exactly what was wrong with the link or email that they clicked on when they receive a phishing email.


(Stu Sjouwerman) #13

Great feedback - just what we wanted to hear. We are actually working on 12 5-min videos that capture the essence of the longer ones.


#14

I have heard similar feedback, and yes, yes!
We’d like posters and other supportive materials that we could educate our clients on how to protect themselves at home; even place in a packet of materials for new clients as well as employee orientation packets.


(Greg Kras) #15

You can get posters and some of the other requested information on this page:


#16

My organization is also leaning towards the short videos. However, any best practices on how to test on these videos? All of us (I assume) have obligations to test on the yearly training, as well as provide on-going supplemental awareness information. For the training, would there be 5 or 10 separate modules in the LMS (or what ever learning system) with 2-3 questions at the end of each? A user could take several classes a year.

Or would the idea be to bundle them together, and have one quiz? (Defeats the purpose of the modules ?)

Appreciate any ideas on this.

To respond to the question, Yes, our uses don’t want to sit for a video – Partially is a YouTube phenomenon perhaps. The video needs to be short and very entertaining…


(Greg Baschak) #17

I like the main videos. However I find that there is some duplication of information / videos.


(James Endicott) #18

Stu,

Thank you very much for your personal response. I am glad to hear you are producing these videos.

James


(Stu Sjouwerman) #19

You are very welcome! Would you like to see a few early ones when they come out of the courseware team?


(James Endicott) #20

Stu,

I would love to see these early videos, thank you! We produced a Phishing video (Before we went to KnowBe4) that was about 3 minutes long. We have a whole series planned, but we just realized we could not keep up with the demand/pace that the videos needed to be released to our internal staff. We are still producing the series of videos, however, they will be targeted at the city’s residents and played on our public channel for their education. The first video in the series was recognized nationally and was something our users really responded to, so thank you for producing these!

James Endicott, Technical Services Manager
Technical Services Division | Information Technology Dept.
220 Fourth Avenue South, Kent, WA 98032
Direct Line 253-856-4620 | Service Desk 253-856-4601
JEndicott@KentWa.gov | ServiceDesk@KentWA.gov

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